Fruit Gardening in the late eighteenth century

or, how to espalier trees against walls. Many of the private residences in England during the eighteenth century had extensive fruit gardens, particularly the large estates, although most people with a bit of land to spare endeavored to grow at least some apples, pears or plums – and, if they had hot houses, citrus fruits and peaches as well. Market…

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Buckingham House (Palace) in the Eighteenth Century

The information in this article comes from a letter written by John Sheffield, the Duke of Buckinghamshire, builder of the house, to the Duke of Shewsbury sometime before Buckinghamshire’s death in 1721. The building we now know as Buckingham Palace, was built originally as Buckingham House in 1703 on the site of Mulberry Gardens (a place where, according to legend,…

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Sissinghurst gardens

An Article for Garden History by Jennifer Ward More than any other garden in England, the grounds surrounding Sissinghurst Castle attract the most widespread acclaim among gardeners. People come in droves every summer to amble through the displays of natural and groomed beauty, nurtured in the middle of the last century by Vita Sackville-West and her husband Harold Nicolson. But…

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A History of Hot Beds

Everyone who has ever had a decent compost heap cooking away in the winter frost knows how hot fermenting vegetable matter – with or without added animal manure – can get. Many gardeners plant cucumbers or other early spring vegetables into the top of cooling compost heaps to take advantage of both the heat and the fertility of the heap….

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Maze Gardens

"Summerhouses of Sin" Maze and Labyrinth Gardens in History Labyrinths are an important part of many cultural heritages and mythologies. Unicursal labyrinths — a labyrinth which consists of a path which twists and turns, but which has no dead ends — can be found as rock paintings dating back thousands of years, while the earliest coin found in the world...

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